Environment

Science and faith a natural fit for climate change marchers

When you think about women religious, the word "science" may not be the first to spring to mind, but for many if not most Catholic sisters, what has shaped climate study and other scientific disciplines also bolsters their conviction that all life on Earth is interdependent, and that the time to intervene on behalf of a struggling planet is now. Sisters, volunteers and other community associates are traveling to Washington, D.C., for the People's Climate March on April 29 to make that point.

Kentucky farm rooted in mission of Dominican Sisters of Peace

The land surrounding the Dominican Sisters of Peace motherhouse has been farmed since 1822.

In the beginning, the sisters farmed the verdant hills to feed the community and the students they taught.

Today, the farm is tended by a farm manager and a part-time farmhand who primarily raise beef cattle.

The heart of the farm's mission is to promote sustainable farming practices and provide quality beef for the sisters and consumers alike, said Danny Spalding, farm manager.

April 10, 2017

"Tell the story from the point of view of the sheep. Or the star. Or the light. Or the stomach of the whale. Point from creation to Christ. Then point back from Christ to creation. Restore creation through redemption. Connect the dots."