Acting on a deep call to a different ministry

It’s impossible to know exactly how many women entered religious life with an unrequited or latent desire for priestly ministry. But if the current number of Womenpriests who used to be sisters is any indication, it was more than a few. There’s no hard data on the issue, but insiders at Roman Catholic Womenpriests, an international organization that has ordained about 103 women and married men since 2002, estimate that more than half of the women they’ve ordained were once Catholic sisters. 

The gentle touch

See for Yourself - One of the highlights of summer is going to the fair. It doesn’t matter what type – county fair, regional fair, state fair. Any fair is a grand celebration of what’s best about society, including agriculture, home arts, food and community.

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Blogs

GSR Today The gentle touch | Aug 27
Visual Life August 27, 2014 | Aug 27
Q & A Q & A with Srs. Catherine Bashir and Violet Sampour | Aug 26

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Contemplate This
Justice Matters
Speaking of God
Capital E: Earth
Conversations with Sr. Camille
From Where I Stand
Simply Spirit

"I sought the Lord, and he answered me, and delivered me from all my fears."

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Q & A with Srs. Catherine Bashir and Violet Sampour

In 1958, eight Dominican sisters from Sparkill, N.Y., traveled to Bahawalpur, Pakistan, as missionaries. Within seven years, a Pakistani congregation of Dominican sisters was receiving its first postulants. Today, there are 14 Pakistani Sparkill Dominicans sisters serving Pakistan’s Christian community in education and health ministries. Two of them talked to GSR about their ministries while visiting their U.S. motherhouse this month.

An update from the Dominicans in Iraq

GSR Today - The situation in Iraq for Christians and others is growing desperate, as there is enormous lack of supplements, food, water, clothes, medication, housing and money. And Erbil cannot accommodate all these people. However, we are doing what we can. All sisters, who are able to work, leave every morning and are out until evening, trying to help people settle and provide some food, with the help of the church and refugee centers.